Vote NO on Tim Eyman’s I-976

Impacts of Initiative 976

On the November 5th ballot, Tim Eyman’s Initiative 976 would devastate our already strained transportation system by cutting funding for road and transit projects from Spokane to Seattle, Bremerton to Zillah and all points in between.

Impacts of Initiative 976
Sound Transit Impacts King County Pierce County Snohomish County Clark County Spokane County Washington State Patrol Freight Mobility Projects Highway Safety Improvements Washington State Ferries Amtrak Cascades Service

Sound Transit Impacts

$20 billion in funding is at risk for voter-approved light rail expansion, bus rapid transit, and commuter rail that will create new connections in King, Pierce, and Snohomish counties.

King County

Loss of 175,000 King County Metro bus service hours on 74 routes in Seattle, Burien, Shoreline, Skyway, Tukwila, and White Center due to a $36 million a year loss in funding for the Seattle Transportation Benefit District.

$119 million in potential cuts to Metro services between 2020 and 2025 due to a $1.5 billion cut to the State’s Multimodal Account. Cuts include RapidRide expansion projects, bus layover facilities, access to transit, speed and reliability improvements, paratransit programs, vanpool services, and transit-oriented development projects.

Additional potential loss of funding for:

SR 405 widening project between Renton and Bellevue. The widening project will improve more reliable travel choices and keep drivers, transit riders, and freight safe and moving in one of the state’s highly congested sections of highway.

SR 520 improvements from Lake Washington to I-5. Improvements include a safer highway for motorists and transit riders by replacing structurally vulnerable bridges, a highway lid, new bicycle and pedestrians land bridges, and new Portage Bay and Montlake Cut bridges.

AND $20 billion in funding is at risk for voter-approved light rail expansion, bus rapid transit, and commuter rail that will create new connections in King, Pierce, and Snohomish counties.

Download more information on the impacts to King County and East King County.

Pierce County

I-976 would cut transportation services in Pierce County, including Pierce Transit Bus Rapid Transit expansion, Park and Ride expansion, transit options for people with disabilities, veterans, and senior citizens, and Pierce Transit’s vanpool service.

Completion of SR 167
The SR 167 project will build four miles of SR 167, completing a long-planned connection to I-5. The project will also connect I-5 to the Port of Tacoma. This project is a missing link in Washington’s highway network and will help move freight to the Port of Tacoma, improve safety, and reduce congestion on local roads.

Local funding
Cities in Pierce County would lose local funding for street and traffic maintenance such as pavement repairs, crack sealing, lane striping, street lighting, signals, and pedestrian improvements such as ADA ramp work and sidewalk repairs.

AND $20 billion in funding is at risk for voter-approved light rail expansion, bus rapid transit, and commuter rail that will create new connections in King, Pierce, and Snohomish counties.

Download more information on the impacts to Pierce County.

Snohomish County

In the last biennium, Snohomish County received $16.6 million in state grants. This funding is at risk and is used for:
-$5 million for Community Transit’s Bus Rapid Transit program, including funding to Swift lines.
-$1.9 million for transit for people with disabilities, Sauk-Suiattle tribe, veterans, and senior citizens.
-$1.7 million for State Route 525 pedestrian and traffic improvements.
-$1.5 million for Community Transit’s vanpool service.
-$500,000 for Park and Ride expansion in Everett.

Local funding
Cities in Snohomish County would lose local funding for street and traffic maintenance such as pavement repairs, crack sealing, lane striping, street lighting, signals, and pedestrian improvements such as ADA ramp work and sidewalk repairs.

AND $20 billion in funding is at risk for voter-approved light rail expansion, bus rapid transit, and commuter rail that will create new connections in King, Pierce, and Snohomish counties.

Download more information on the impacts to Snohomish County.

Clark County

Potential loss or reduction of funding for:

The replacement of the aging I-5 bridge over the Columbia River.

State Route 14 widening project aimed at reducing congestion by adding lanes to SR 14 between I-205 and Southeast 164th Avenue.

Human Services Council (HSC) program that provides transportation service to employment sites, job training, job search, job interviews, childcare, and other work-related activities.

HSC's Reserve-a-Ride Program that provides transportation options to individuals living in Clark, Cowlitz, and Wahkiakum Counties where public transportation is not available.

Funding cuts to C-Tran’s vanpool improvements, such as new vans and added service.

AND loss of over a $5.2 million per year to Vancouver, Battle Ground, Ridgefield, and Washougal TBD funding.

Download more information on the impacts to Clark County.

Spokane County

Potential loss of funding for:

The 10.5 mile North/South Freeway Project, which is expected to carry 150,000 vehicles a day.

Dial-a-ride, paratransit, and fixed-route services for seniors, veterans, and people with disabilities.

Spokane Transit’s Monroe-Regal line, a high performance bus route that will provide frequent, reliable, all-day service alone this regional corridor.

Spokane Transit vanpool improvements, such as new vehicles and service expansions.

Spokane Tribe of Indians’ Moccasin Express fixed-route service and vehicle replacement.

AND $2.5 million loss per year to Spokane TBD funding.

Download more information on the impacts to Spokane.

Washington State Patrol

A $15 million loss a year for the Washington State Patrol, including traffic enforcement and associated criminal investigations, commercial vehicle enforcement, and ferry vessel and terminal security.

Freight Mobility Projects

Part of $4 billion in statewide cuts, I-976 repeals funding for freight mobility projects that make it easier for our exports and imports to get to the port.
Our farmers and manufacturers depend on good rail and freight mobility.

Highway Safety Improvements

Part of $4 billion in statewide cuts, I-976 repeals funding for critical highway safety improvements, eliminating our ability to fix dangerous highways and retrofit 160 bridges and overpasses for earthquake safety.
Projects include I-405, ST 520, North/South Freeway in Spokane, ST 167/509 completion, and I-90 Snoqualmie Pass.

Washington State Ferries

Part of $4 billion in statewide cuts, I-976 creates a $1.3 billion loss to ferry vessel improvements between now and 2031.

Amtrak Cascades Service

Part of the $4 billion in statewide cuts, I-976 repeals funding for improved Amtrak service connecting Western Washington with British Columbia and Oregon.

All parts of our state are growing, and some of our worst growing pains are around commutes and transportation.


MORE CONGESTION

Our roads and highways are some of the most congested in the nation, causing us to spend hundreds of hours stuck in traffic each year. We also have roads and bridges in dangerous condition and freight corridors in need of improvement.

By repealing critical transportation funding, I-976 cripples our ability to fix dangerous highways, retrofit bridges and overpasses, fund transit, expand light rail, maintain ferries, build voter-approved projects, improve freight corridors, and invest in the Washington State Patrol.

NOT FAIR

Vulnerable neighbors are impacted most by I-976. Not only does I-976 threaten funds to build and maintain roads, bridges and safe and reliable transit, but it specifically targets funds that pay for special services for seniors, veterans, children and the disabled.  I-976 also threatens to cut transit services across the state, cutting off access to opportunity to many Washingtonians.

By repealing critical transportation funding, I-976 puts major transportation projects across the state at risk and makes it harder for local communities to solve their own transportation problems.

TOO COSTLY

Our economy depends on our transportation system. Whether you are a farmer trying to get your product to a port, or a small retail business, or even a large business with employees who commute to work, you depend on a safe and effective transportation system.

I-976 threatens road, rail and public transportation investments that connect millions of people to jobs, education, health care, and each other every year.

Vote NO on I-976.

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