About I-976

Tim Eyman’s Initiative 976 Comes at a High Cost

This essentially stops resources going to state, regional and local infrastructure projects, crippling our ability to fix dangerous highways, retrofit bridges and overpasses, fund transit, expand light rail, maintain ferries, build voter-approved projects, and improve the freight corridors that are the lifeblood of our economy.

I-976 also specifically targets funds that pay for special services for senior citizens, veterans, children and people with disabilities. Other services who depend on transportation funding, such as the Washington State Patrol, would also see cuts.

Even local projects, approved by local voters, would be hit. Local communities use Transportation Benefit Districts (TBD) to pay for road construction, maintenance and local transit service. I-976 would eliminate $60 million in TBD funding for 62 cities as diverse as Zillah, Wenatchee, Mercer Island, Everett, Buckley and Mabton.

More Congestion. Not Fair. Too Costly.

Here is more detail about the transportation projects threatened by I-976.

MORE CONGESTION

I-976 repeals critical transportation funding, essentially eliminating our ability to fix dangerous highways, retrofit bridges and overpasses, fund transit, expand light rail, maintain ferries, build voter-approved projects, improve freight corridors, and invest in the Washington State Patrol. It hurts projects from Spokane to Seattle, Bellingham to Vancouver and all points in between. At risk are:

  • State funding for critical transportation projects like I-405, SR 520, North/South freeway in Spokane, SR 167/509 completion and I-90/Snoqualmie Pass
  • Voter-approved local transit and light rail expansion
  • Highway safety projects including retrofitting bridges and overpasses and funding for the State Patrol
  • Ferry improvements
  • Improved Amtrak service, from Canada to Oregon
  • Freight mobility projects that make it easier for our exports and imports to get to port
  • $60 million in funding every year is at risk to pay for road construction, maintenance and local transit service in 62 cities. These cities are as diverse as Zillah, Wenatchee, Mercer Island, Everett, Buckley and Mabton, and are all solving local problems with local funds.

Resources

The state did an analysis of I-976 when it was being considered by the Legislature in the 2019 session. Here are some supporting documents, detailing the projected project impact.

NOT FAIR

Vulnerable neighbors are impacted most by I-976.Not only does I-976 threaten funds tobuild and maintain roads and transit options that people depend on to get to work ands school, but it specifically targets funds that pay for special services for senior citizens, veterans, children and people with disabilities.

By repealing critical transportation funding, I-976 puts major transportation projects across the state at risk and makes it harder for local communities to solve their own transportation problems.

TOO COSTLY

I-976 threatens more than $25 billion in road, rail and public transportation investments that connect millions of people to jobs, education, health care, and each other every year.